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11th December 2016
EDITOR
EDITORS NOTE: Did Anyone else know about this change in BC?? I am appalled!


Short and long term drinking water advisories that are in place in First Nation communities on reserve located south of the 60 degree parallel in Canada.

As of September 30, 2016, there were 138 Drinking Water Advisories in effect in 93 First Nations communities across Canada, excluding British Columbia.

Note: Health Canada no longer reports drinking water advisories in British Columbia First Nations. More information on drinking water advisories in British Columbia First Nations.

Drinking water advisories are preventive measures put in place to protect public health from drinking water that could be contaminated. In a First Nation community, a drinking water advisory can affect as little as one building and does not always represent a community-wide drinking water problem.

There are three types of drinking water advisories:

Boil Water Advisories/Orders (BWAs/BWOs)
Do Not Consume Advisories/Orders (DNCAs/DNCOs), also called Do Not Drink Advisories/Orders (DNDAs/DNDOs)
Do Not Use Advisories/Orders (DNUAs/DNUOs)
Drinking water advisories are put in place for various reasons. For instance, a community may issue an advisory if there are problems in the overall water system, such as line breaks, equipment failure, or poor filtration/disinfection during water treatment.

Communities may also choose to issue a drinking water advisory as a precautionary measure, such as when there are emergency repairs in the water distribution system or if a community does not have a trained Water System Operator or Community-based Drinking Water Quality Monitor in place.

For more information, please contact: FNIHB_DrinkingWater.DGSPNI_EauPotablehc-sc.gc.ca

More information on drinking water advisories in British Columbia First Nations

As part of the British Columbia Tripartite Framework Agreement on First Nation Health Governance, on October 1st 2013, Health Canada transferred its role in the design, management, and delivery of First Nations health programming in British Columbia to the new First Nations Health Authority (FNHA). Therefore, Health Canada no longer reports drinking water advisories in BC First Nations.

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/promotion/public-publique/water-dwa-eau-aqep-eng.php#more